E-Petitions and Mobilisation Dynamics: The Importance of Local Anchoring. An Environmental Case Study - Université de Lille Accéder directement au contenu
Pré-Publication, Document De Travail Année : 2022

E-Petitions and Mobilisation Dynamics: The Importance of Local Anchoring. An Environmental Case Study

Résumé

E-petitioning is a useful object of study for observing the potential emergence of a new relationship to politics and new forms of political participation. Access to a dataset of hundreds of thousands of users of an electronic petitioning platform, provides the opportunity to overcome a certain number of limitations that are associated with traditional methods of studying political participation, since it allows us to focus on the reality of the signatories' behaviour rather than on their declarations. We follow the traces left by the petitioners on this site to better understand the process of dissemination of an online petition, and its linked with offline activities. Our examination of the three most signed petitions in the 'environment' category, combining an analysis of their petitioning dynamics and an analysis of the comments attached to them, allows us to show: firstly, that there is an interwoven relationship between the local anchoring of the mobilisation and the processes of dissemination by which petitions extend from local signatories to signatories who are geographically more distant; and secondly, that it is not accurate to imagine that just anyone can sign any petition, since petitioning dynamics proceed from one person to the next, whether these dynamics start from a pre-existing local anchorage on the ground, or act through a platform effect which is dependent on the attractiveness of the petition in question.

Dates et versions

hal-04362451 , version 1 (22-12-2023)

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Citer

Martine Legris, Regis Matuszewicz. E-Petitions and Mobilisation Dynamics: The Importance of Local Anchoring. An Environmental Case Study. 2022. ⟨hal-04362451⟩
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